Part 3

project - 02

Social media accounts

commune

blind date

blind date

addendum

briefs & weekly plans

briefs & weekly plans

evaluation & statement

evaluation & statement

bibliography

bibliography

Part 3

project - 01

project - 01

project - 02

project - 03

project - 03

project - 04

project - 04

 UNREAD IT 

Project 02 - THE BOX OF TOUCH

 RESEARCH 

Central Saint Martins Library

SKIN:

A NATURAL HISTORY

NINA G. JABLONSKI

  • TOUCH, page 97
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SKIN

TOUCH

PAGE 97

The skin houses the most ancient sense, touch. [...]

 [...] The importance of touch in human affairs is reflected in our language; [...] "keep in touch", [...] "how touching" [...] "I am touched".

[...] the sensitivity of human fingertips is remarkable, and it's particularly acute in people that have lost their eyesight. [...] which can discern even tiny details of a surface or protuberance. [...] the part of the brain that sighted people use to interpret visual information (visual cortex) is actually recruited to interpret stimuli received through touch and hearing. 

[...] "Don't touch!" goes against just about every impulse in a primate's body.

PAGE 103

During birth, primates are exposed to a sequence of intense tactile experiences[...].

NOTE:

In this very brief chapter, I read more about the social interaction through touch. I think this could be an interesting aspect of communication design. Since it is supposed to TOUCH people.

But I also learned that the sense of touch is the first sense that we develop and that we keep using through our entire life since it is based on the contact with our skin it is logical that it is the sense that most disabled people use to communicate.

Central Saint Martins Library

SENSATION AND PERCEPTION

RICHARD L. GREGORY & ANDREW M. COLMAN

  • The skin, body and chemical senses
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SENSATION AND PERCEPTION

THE SKIN:

PAGE 71

[...] three primary cutaneous qualities have been identified: pressure or touch (also called contact, tactual, or tactile stimulation), temperature (cold or warm), and pain. [...] are mediated by different specialized receptors embedded within the layers of the skin. [...] the primary sensory receptors [...] are hairless – certain facial regions including the lips and mouth, palms of the hands, and soles of the feet.

PAGE 73

[...] all regions of the skin are not uniformly sensitive to all forms of cutaneous stimulation. [...] 

NOTE:

I could use the three primary cutaneous qualities as a starting point for my outcomes. One for each type. Also, note that not all the surface of the skin analyses these the same way.

Why not interact with different parts of the body and skin?

SENSATION AND PERCEPTION

TOUCH AND PRESSURE:

PAGE 73 - TOUCH LOCALISATION

[...] it takes more contact or pressure to feel something on the thigh or the sole of the foot than on the fingertips or on the face.

[...] stimulation on the fingertip or the lip is extremely well localised, producing an error in the observer's perception of where the stimulus was applied of only about 2 millimetres. In contrast, stimulation of the upper arm, thigh or back produces an error of localization of more than 1cm.

PAGE 75 - the skin and brain

Some skin regions such as those of the fingers, lips, and tongue are more densely supplied with nerve fibres; [...] more sensitive than other skin areas such as the shoulders;[...]

PAGE 76 - The Braille system

[...] the experienced adult Braille reader can reach 100 words or more per minute.

PAGE 76 - The Tadoma method

[...]blind and deaf people use the Tadoma method of speech reception [...] the "listener" places his or her hand in contact with specific parts of the speaker's lips, jaw and neck so that the hand receives some of the complex patterns of vibration stimulation in the airflow and lip and jaw movements produced by the speaker's vocalisations.[...] 

PAGE 77 - Tactile visual substitution system

[...] Indeed it is impossible to convert a visual image into a direct tactual display on the skin by using a technology called the Tactile visual substitution system. [...] "seeing with the skin" [...] 

PAGE 77 - Tactual Stereognosis

[...] the familiar and extremely accurate ability to perceive three-dimensional shapes by palpation or manipulation by the hands. Indeed, almost effortlessly we can identify objects solely on the basis of how they "feel".

 

NOTE:

 

These are all very scientific affirmations, but I could have a more theoretical section in the book and then use that to "weight" on my descriptions on how to use touch to create exciting and more accessible Graphic Design.

SENSATION AND PERCEPTION

TEMPERATURE:

PAGE 78 - adaptation to temperature

[...] These sensory effects of thermal adaptation point out that the skin is not a good indicator of physical temperature.

[...] Thus thermal sensations occur as a result of the relation of the temperature of the skin surface to the temperature of its surroundings rather than from the reception of absolute physical temperature itself. 

 

NOTE:

The most amazing thing I've found in this chapter is that the sensation of temperature is not at all representative of the actual temperature.

SENSATION AND PERCEPTION

PAIN:

PAGE 79

[...] It is clear that towards the extremes of thermal stimulation – freezing and boiling – thermal sensations merge with those of pain. This is a biologically adaptative association because intense thermal stimulation can produce tissue damage. Since painful stimuli, in general, are immediately attended to, this helps protect the organism against harmful and even lethal thermal extremes.

PAGE 80 - Variability in pain perception

[...] rather pain may accompass a range of different, unpleasant experiences produced by a wide variety of potentially harmful, noxious events.

[...] the relation between pain and bodily injury extends from injury with no pain to extreme pain with little or no injury. A pain stimulus that is experienced as extreme in on situation may not be so in another.

[...] Clearly there are numerous cognitive, social and cultural factors that markedly affect pain perception. Indeed it is often the case that the same injury produces different effects in different individuals.

Rather than showing the effects of pain, the celebrants appear more in a state of exaltation and ecstasy. [...] pain perception may be linked to culture[...] Canadian Indians [...] 

PAGE 81 - Endorphins

There is considerable evidence that the body produces natural pain suppressors called endorphins. Endorphins are neurotransmitter chemicals [...] that interact with a particular kind of neuron called an opiate receptor. [...] act to reduce pain.

NOTE:

How impressive is that your ability to feel pain depends not only on your neurological complexity but also on your cultural background.

Central Saint Martins Library

THE BOOK OF TOUCH

CONSTANCE CLASSEN

  • TACTILE COMMUNICATION, page 18
  • TOUCH IN THE MUSEUM, page 275
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THE BOOK OF TOUCH

TACTILE COMMUNICATION:

PAGE 18

[...] In the "bubble" of privacy that people maintain around themselves, touch perhaps represents the most direct invasion.

PAGE 24 – conclusion

[...] there is much to learn from their (blind and deaf people) experience.

HELLEN KELLER QUOTE:

" Touch brings the blind many many sweet certainties..." – see image

THE BOOK OF TOUCH

TOUCH IN THE MUSEUM

PAGE 276

[...] multisensory investigations were supported by contemporary scientific practice.

Hooke (Robert Hooke), [...] explicitly stated that "ocular inspection" must be accompanied by the "manual handling... of the very things themselves".

Using multiple senses to investigate museum objects enhanced the impression of having comprehended their nature.

[...] the sense of touch was believed to have access to interior truths of which sight was unaware. 

Handling museum artefacts gave visitors the satisfaction of an intimate encounter.

[...] the sense of touch is essential [...] it enables [...] to establish an imaginative intimacy, which is evidently eagerly desired, [...]

NOTES:

Even if this information applies to museum experience - I think that the overall conclusion, touch is an important aspect for the human to truly understand so he can create a connection with the actual object.

Central Saint Martins Library

THE SENSES CONSIDERED AS PERCEPTUAL SYTEMS

JAMES J. GIBSON

  • THE CAPABILITIES OF THE HAPTIC SYSTEM, pages 116-134
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THE SENSES CONSIDERED AS PERCEPTUAL SENSES

EXPLORATORY PERCEPTION WITH HAPTIC TOUCH:

PAGE 125

The manual activity might be called scanning, but it is not the same as visual scanning, [...]

PAGE 126 – Surface Texture

[...] The texture of a surface is probably even more important to animals than its pigment colour in identifying it, but the discrimination of texture has scarcely been studied by sensory psychologists, whereas the discrimination of colour has enlisted a disproportionate amount of research.

PAGE 134 – Summary of Chapters 6 and 7

[...] Nevertheless, the perceptions of the blind, and blindfolded subjects, can sometimes rival those of seeing persons and this fact shows how much information is obtained by it.

PAGE 135

[...] The sense of touch in the everyday meaning of the term turns out to be an extremely elaborate and powerful perceptual system but not a sense in either the physiological or the introspective meaning of the term.

[...] The common sense belief in touch as a way of getting information is justified.

 

NOTE:

Here we have a more tangible point of view since the book gives us some information on the actual sense of touch and how it is beneficial to create a touching connection in order to have more accurate responses. 

THE SENSES CONSIDERED AS PERCEPTUAL SENSES

EXPLORATORY PERCEPTION WITH HAPTIC TOUCH:

PAGE 123 

Active exploratory touch permits both the grasping of an object and a grasp of its meaning. [...]

The hand can grope, palpate, prod, press, rub, or heft and other properties of an object can thus be detected in the absence of vision. The properties we call "tangible" are:

  1. geometrical variables like shape, dimensions and proportions, slopes and edges, or curves and protuberances;
  2. surface variables like texture, or roughness-smoothness;
  3. material variables like heaviness or mass and rigidity-plasticity;

[...] Haptics is not so inferior to optics as we suppose, since the blind depend upon it for a whole realm of useful perception.

[...] The perceptual capacity of the hand goes unrecognized because we usually attend to its motor capacity, and also because the visual input dominates the haptic in awareness.

 

PAGE 124

[...] We become aware of haptic perception as such only when we must work in the dark, or without looking or when, occasionally, it is actually more acute than visual perception. Examples of the latter would be when a butcher tests the sharpness of a knife with his finger, or a cabinetmaker tests the smoothness of his work by rubbing his finger over it.

NOTE:

In this first chapter we can understand how we still look for a confirmation of what we seen by touching it. This is our way of confirming what we see is accurate.

BUT WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IN OUR BRAIN WHEN WE USE THIS TO MISLEAD SOMEONE. Can we? or What do graphic designers not use this sense to make more immersive design and create a more "accurate" point of view?

 

https://www.youtube.com/user/TommyEdisonXP

THE TOMMY EDISON EXPERIENCE

  • Blind Person's Favorite Color, 2017 

The Tommy Edison Experience

NOTE:

 

The first place I've been looking for testimonies of Blind people was internet and more specifically youtube. 

"Tommy Edison, who has been blind since birth, uses humour to answer the most popular questions about living without sight, takes on more challenges which test his other senses, and goes on adventures that allow him to experience things for the first time."

I'm considering entering into contact with Blind people to understand their opinions on design and art and how I, as a creative, can expand my ideas to another level. Incorporate an interactive aspect into graphic design, Printmaking and Illustration. I firmly believe that by doing so I can not only raise awareness but can at the same time elevate my understanding of what design is.

 

This youtuber is one of my sources and I love how his positivity and humour. These are aspects I would love to incorporate in this work and make it more light and more approachable.

Hellen Keller Quote

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 REFLECTION 

 OUTCOMES 

19/03

Crit

The crit surprised me because, yes this project was experimenting and finally making something by embossing fabric (which was the challenge of this week) and I did it. But that was all what I did for this box. Surprisingly people were intrigued and wanted to really touch it and interact with it - which in a way shows that this project was successful since it's the aim of my Unit 7.

I also took the time to ask the people I was with, what they would have put on the box. The responses were: postcards, fun facts about touch, a poster,... so that could be a lead for next weeks project: find with what I could fill the box. 

15/03

Mounting/creation day

Today was creation day. I regret I did not documented to process of making the box. Overall I'm happy that my ideas sort of worked and that I created a really professional looking box. I'm also quite sad with the fact that I did not manage my time very well and that my first idea could not be made. My bigger mistake I guess is that my idea depended too much on me meeting with a blind person. Though I know more about the sense of touch and that this project was really based on research and that was really interesting. I wished I could've made something more than just a box.

 

14/03

Research

I-ve found different uses of texture in graphic design. I think most of them re really smart. One common point to all of them is the use of materials to create interaction (bubble wrap, threat, embossing, ... ).  In the end they're all based on the notion of relief print.

13/03

Research and Grayson Perry

I had to really rethink what i am doing... All the people that I tried to contact did not answer or refused because of the short amount of time. I now decided to work based on my research and what I’vfe Found about touch in theory.

GRAYSON PERRY TALK:

Something that I'm going to try to apply on this work (that he said) is that my first outcomes are very experimental and even if they do make sense to my tutors and/or colleagues they may not be appreciated or understood by the outside world. I was thinking it may be a good idea to analyse and also document the reaction of the "mortals" facing this week outcome (maybe the next ones?). Overall I want to make sure that my results are easy to read and to understand /clear. 

12/03

PROGRESS TUTORIAL

I took the time during this weekend to understand and make sure my concept was clear. By doing so, I also made sure to select a demographic my project was for. 

During the tutorial I expected my tutor to be more severe about was I was showing her, but instead, she looked very enthusiastic and supportive. I think this gave me more pressure than confidence because now I don't want to disappoint her. I still wish that she was more critical and would provide ways of reflecting and leads to make my work more understandable.

11/03

RESEARCH

 

Now that my project is written I have a lot of research to make since my outcomes are based on what I'm doing as research. I also started to contact some associations of blind people.

I need to come out with a second plan if I don't manage to interview blind people - maybe a good idea not to bas all my work on this interviews.

experiment on Blindfolded subjects?

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